ENDLESSFIELD

// landscape / art / environment / design / space / happenings / etc \\

Sean Connaughty testing out the crane capabilities. Ark of the Anthropocene.
There’s still time to donate to the travel expense fund: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/834966967/ark-of-the-anthropocene

Nearing the finish line with the Kickstarter! Launch happens tomorrow in Duluth!

Peering Through The Ecological Expanse  
http://landeagle.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/peering-through-the-ecological-expanse-transmission-from-the-curator-of-the-data-1/ View high resolution

Sean Connaughty testing out the crane capabilities. Ark of the Anthropocene.
There’s still time to donate to the travel expense fund: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/834966967/ark-of-the-anthropocene

Nearing the finish line with the Kickstarter! Launch happens tomorrow in Duluth!

Peering Through The Ecological Expanse
http://landeagle.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/peering-through-the-ecological-expanse-transmission-from-the-curator-of-the-data-1/

Duluth harbor, an epic setting. View high resolution

Duluth harbor, an epic setting.

Ark of The Anthropocene, Sean Connaughty 2014 View high resolution

Ark of The Anthropocene, Sean Connaughty 2014

Going back and looking at an early photo I took of Sean Connaughty’s work I now begin to realize that the scaling up of his work has changed the way I have come to intellectualize its greater meaning. His smaller-scaler work fits into an aquarium that would look right in your living room or in a small pond in the backyard. One can easily spin the orb in the water using one hand with a twist. It’s enjoyable to watch this miniature world inside spiral around, as though it were a tiny planet in an aqueous universe. That these small biospheres are self-sustainable also means you can look through their looking glass lenses and not feel threatened by or responsible for the nature that is unfolding inside that world. Plants die back and then regain their stature. The miniature world is contained and the plants go about their business without huge catastrophe. I do not intend to make quaint the life-forms which manifest inside the terrarium world. There is a whole other plane of existence on which plants operate that is unseen by us, their sentience namely.

Now, when Connaughty’s work begins to reflect a space (or place) that is more habitable by humans, the more co-mingling this territory necessitates. In the same way that a scientist cannot completely detach from his experiment by observational impact, the Ark of the Anthropocene will be linked to its makers (artist plus collaborators) in an equally unseen way. This is what makes Connaughty’s newest work so strong: that it proposes a process of integrating community that is inclusive to the living and the non-living, a seed for example. The living and dead are connected. Ideas and actions are connected. Technology and Nature are connected. This process of art-making is infectious because it diverts the drive and asserts the idea of the transmissive potential of art through continual re-creation. And this point compels to peer outside our common vision, the one we traverse in our daily lives bombarded by media, information, rules, our own hang-ups and human-centered responsibilities. Transmission means to move across, to send beyond. The Ark of the Anthropocene sends out what it receives, like a forest that emits signals underground, in the canopy, and into the air we breathe. In The Three Ecologies, Felix Guattari proposes a new eco-logic, or ecological practice, in which

          “creative expression as such will take precedence over collective goals. This new logic – and I wish to stress this point – has affinities with that of the artist, who may be induced to refashion an entire piece of work after the intrusion of some accidental detail, a petty incident which suddenly deflects the project from its initial trajectory, diverting it from what may well have been a clearly formulated vision of its eventual shape.”

Accidents change the course of humanity… and we will likely need to adjust to a future “scenario that is both terrifying and fascinating” [Guattari]. Confronting the accidents will lead to a very different understanding of our relationship to the cosmos. When our common vision becomes disrupted, a shift in consciousness is possible. When the force behind that interruption is artistic and infused with an ethics of openness, an ecology following the Eros principle, there is possibility for real revolution. Creativity can expand our relationships beyond symbol and free us from our psychosis to control all the variables. Here one of the transmissions* from the data which will be sealed inside the Ark of the Anthropocene laments: “Unexpected things happen / Even when you plan.” When the signal is sent we can have no knowledge for what response will return or what will transpire. The main point here is the attempt to relate, to go across, which is the hidden value in the ecology of the universe.

A second transmission sings:

I got me a stinger as long as my right arm / I pierced the hide of the Earth / And it’s infected

The earth has hide, but it also has skin, which is in constant state of renewal. As curator of the data, I have come to appreciate the full range of the possible in regards to the artistic undertaking, from skin to hide so to speak. The way forward is survival, a monumental task to be sure. Ultimately, this new world [Guattari, again] “demands… that we face up to the logic of the ambivalence of desire (I’ambivalence desirante) wherever it is found (in culture, everyday life, work, sport, etc.); that we re-evaluate the ultimate goal of work and human activities in terms of criteria other than those of profit and productivity; that we acknowledge the need to mobilize individuals and social segments in ways that are always diverse and different;” For instance: Technology grafted onto art launched into a harbor; Art storing sacred things that speak to the creative energies of the enduring universe; Art that is discovered with diving suit on or by paddling a boat; Art which seeks the contribution of its community, which is ever-expanding thanks to technology. These inclusions embrace time-space as a unifying pattern by a process of enrichment. And finally, when closing his essay, Guattari quotes Walter Benjamin, which tells of an artist who inhabits his art through the oldest art-form there is: “Story-telling … does not aim to convey the pure essence of a thing, like information or a report. It sinks the thing into the life of the story-teller, in order to bring it out of him again. Thus traces of the story-teller cling to the story the way the handprints of the potter cling to the clay vessel.” This is the transformation I see when the work of an artist elevates his art and has the courage to drop it into one of the greatest lakes, Lake Superior, with full knowledge that he has woven a story that will float on into new and expansive territories.

* The transmissions are from an experimental group of work created by Sean Connaughty and close collaborators featuring sound and visual improvisations — a video installation of atmospheric space odyssey-like sound experimentation in a sub-zero igloo in Duluth

///

Go to Connaughty’s Kickstarter to learn more about the nuts and bolts of his project, and help fund the transport of Ark of The Anthropocene to Duluth’s harbor.
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/834966967/ark-of-the-anthropocene?ref=category

This is part of Connaughty’s solo exhibit at the Duluth Art Institute on September 11th. There will also be an exhibit opening curated by Connaughty at Prøve Gallery on September 12th.
http://www.provegallery.com/ View high resolution

Going back and looking at an early photo I took of Sean Connaughty’s work I now begin to realize that the scaling up of his work has changed the way I have come to intellectualize its greater meaning. His smaller-scaler work fits into an aquarium that would look right in your living room or in a small pond in the backyard. One can easily spin the orb in the water using one hand with a twist. It’s enjoyable to watch this miniature world inside spiral around, as though it were a tiny planet in an aqueous universe. That these small biospheres are self-sustainable also means you can look through their looking glass lenses and not feel threatened by or responsible for the nature that is unfolding inside that world. Plants die back and then regain their stature. The miniature world is contained and the plants go about their business without huge catastrophe. I do not intend to make quaint the life-forms which manifest inside the terrarium world. There is a whole other plane of existence on which plants operate that is unseen by us, their sentience namely.

Now, when Connaughty’s work begins to reflect a space (or place) that is more habitable by humans, the more co-mingling this territory necessitates. In the same way that a scientist cannot completely detach from his experiment by observational impact, the Ark of the Anthropocene will be linked to its makers (artist plus collaborators) in an equally unseen way. This is what makes Connaughty’s newest work so strong: that it proposes a process of integrating community that is inclusive to the living and the non-living, a seed for example. The living and dead are connected. Ideas and actions are connected. Technology and Nature are connected. This process of art-making is infectious because it diverts the drive and asserts the idea of the transmissive potential of art through continual re-creation. And this point compels to peer outside our common vision, the one we traverse in our daily lives bombarded by media, information, rules, our own hang-ups and human-centered responsibilities. Transmission means to move across, to send beyond. The Ark of the Anthropocene sends out what it receives, like a forest that emits signals underground, in the canopy, and into the air we breathe. In The Three Ecologies, Felix Guattari proposes a new eco-logic, or ecological practice, in which

“creative expression as such will take precedence over collective goals. This new logic – and I wish to stress this point – has affinities with that of the artist, who may be induced to refashion an entire piece of work after the intrusion of some accidental detail, a petty incident which suddenly deflects the project from its initial trajectory, diverting it from what may well have been a clearly formulated vision of its eventual shape.”

Accidents change the course of humanity… and we will likely need to adjust to a future “scenario that is both terrifying and fascinating” [Guattari]. Confronting the accidents will lead to a very different understanding of our relationship to the cosmos. When our common vision becomes disrupted, a shift in consciousness is possible. When the force behind that interruption is artistic and infused with an ethics of openness, an ecology following the Eros principle, there is possibility for real revolution. Creativity can expand our relationships beyond symbol and free us from our psychosis to control all the variables. Here one of the transmissions* from the data which will be sealed inside the Ark of the Anthropocene laments: “Unexpected things happen / Even when you plan.” When the signal is sent we can have no knowledge for what response will return or what will transpire. The main point here is the attempt to relate, to go across, which is the hidden value in the ecology of the universe.

A second transmission sings:

I got me a stinger as long as my right arm / I pierced the hide of the Earth / And it’s infected

The earth has hide, but it also has skin, which is in constant state of renewal. As curator of the data, I have come to appreciate the full range of the possible in regards to the artistic undertaking, from skin to hide so to speak. The way forward is survival, a monumental task to be sure. Ultimately, this new world [Guattari, again] “demands… that we face up to the logic of the ambivalence of desire (I’ambivalence desirante) wherever it is found (in culture, everyday life, work, sport, etc.); that we re-evaluate the ultimate goal of work and human activities in terms of criteria other than those of profit and productivity; that we acknowledge the need to mobilize individuals and social segments in ways that are always diverse and different;” For instance: Technology grafted onto art launched into a harbor; Art storing sacred things that speak to the creative energies of the enduring universe; Art that is discovered with diving suit on or by paddling a boat; Art which seeks the contribution of its community, which is ever-expanding thanks to technology. These inclusions embrace time-space as a unifying pattern by a process of enrichment. And finally, when closing his essay, Guattari quotes Walter Benjamin, which tells of an artist who inhabits his art through the oldest art-form there is: “Story-telling … does not aim to convey the pure essence of a thing, like information or a report. It sinks the thing into the life of the story-teller, in order to bring it out of him again. Thus traces of the story-teller cling to the story the way the handprints of the potter cling to the clay vessel.” This is the transformation I see when the work of an artist elevates his art and has the courage to drop it into one of the greatest lakes, Lake Superior, with full knowledge that he has woven a story that will float on into new and expansive territories.

* The transmissions are from an experimental group of work created by Sean Connaughty and close collaborators featuring sound and visual improvisations — a video installation of atmospheric space odyssey-like sound experimentation in a sub-zero igloo in Duluth

///

Go to Connaughty’s Kickstarter to learn more about the nuts and bolts of his project, and help fund the transport of Ark of The Anthropocene to Duluth’s harbor.
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/834966967/ark-of-the-anthropocene?ref=category

This is part of Connaughty’s solo exhibit at the Duluth Art Institute on September 11th. There will also be an exhibit opening curated by Connaughty at Prøve Gallery on September 12th.
http://www.provegallery.com/

Ark of the Anthropocene, Sean Connaughty 2014

Outside the Weisman Art Museum for Northern Spark. View high resolution

Ark of the Anthropocene, Sean Connaughty 2014

Outside the Weisman Art Museum for Northern Spark.

Getting the biosphere ready for harbor living. Ark of the Anthropocene, Sean Connaughty 2014. View high resolution

Getting the biosphere ready for harbor living. Ark of the Anthropocene, Sean Connaughty 2014.

Ark of the Anthropocene, by artist Sean Connaughty View high resolution

Ark of the Anthropocene, by artist Sean Connaughty

Ark of the Anthropocene, by artist Sean Connaughty, on view at the Weisman Art Museum earlier this summer as part of Norther Spark in Minneapolis. View high resolution

Ark of the Anthropocene, by artist Sean Connaughty, on view at the Weisman Art Museum earlier this summer as part of Norther Spark in Minneapolis.

Ark of the Anthropocene, by artist Sean Connaughty View high resolution

Ark of the Anthropocene, by artist Sean Connaughty

Ark of the Anthropocene

Ark of the Anthropocene, a work of art by artist Sean Connaughty, is set to launch in the harbor of Duluth in Lake Superior in the coming weeks. Go here for more details: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/834966967/ark-of-the-anthropocene

especially if you would like to support this approx. 3,500 lb sculpture’s transport from Minneapolis up to Duluth, and then safely into the water. It will be part of the artist’s solo exhibit at the Duluth Art Institute in September.

go here for more images: http://landeagle.wordpress.com/2014/08/11/ark-of-the-anthropocene/

Vote for this now! 
weworkhere:

A PUBLIC THING NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT
In November, Shanai and I were part of collaboration that launched A PUBLIC THING - an experimental civic platform that creates open space, in public and in print, for substantive conversation on pressing societal issues.
The first APT gathering was held at Peavey Plaza in downtown Minneapolis and addressed financial independence and interdependence. Energized by OWS and the 99% Movement, we created a temporary commons where anyone could ask a burning question and immediately make connections with others in the community who had relevant knowledge, stories, and questions of their own. About 50 people showed up, and we had some great conversations! This gathering became the source of a collectively-authored, beautifully designed, print publication that created space for the conversation beyond the event. With help from an awesome team of organizers, contributors, and editors, we printed 2,000 copies of the newspaper and distributed it for free during the holiday shopping season. It’s also available online at apublicthing.org and in print at our new Works Progress office space at Lake and Chicago. (Come say hello!)
We’re looking for a way to continue the project in the spring, and we need your support. If you’ve got a moment, check out our entry to Good Magazine’s 30 Day Challenge on Financial Fitness, and please vote for A PUBLIC THING if you think our idea is a good one! Winning the $500 prize would allow us to host another iteration of APT this spring, connect the program up to the equity work we’ve been doing, and cover our costs for a second issue of the APT newspaper.
↪ CLICK HERE TO VOTE! ↩
There are just 4 days of voting left so we’d truly appreciate it if you help us spread the word! (You can share our entry on Facebook or Twitter directly from the website after voting.) Thank you thank you!
View high resolution

Vote for this now! 

weworkhere:

A PUBLIC THING NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT

In November, Shanai and I were part of collaboration that launched A PUBLIC THING - an experimental civic platform that creates open space, in public and in print, for substantive conversation on pressing societal issues.

The first APT gathering was held at Peavey Plaza in downtown Minneapolis and addressed financial independence and interdependence. Energized by OWS and the 99% Movement, we created a temporary commons where anyone could ask a burning question and immediately make connections with others in the community who had relevant knowledge, stories, and questions of their own. About 50 people showed up, and we had some great conversations! This gathering became the source of a collectively-authored, beautifully designed, print publication that created space for the conversation beyond the event. With help from an awesome team of organizers, contributors, and editors, we printed 2,000 copies of the newspaper and distributed it for free during the holiday shopping season. It’s also available online at apublicthing.org and in print at our new Works Progress office space at Lake and Chicago. (Come say hello!)

We’re looking for a way to continue the project in the spring, and we need your support. If you’ve got a moment, check out our entry to Good Magazine’s 30 Day Challenge on Financial Fitness, and please vote for A PUBLIC THING if you think our idea is a good one! Winning the $500 prize would allow us to host another iteration of APT this spring, connect the program up to the equity work we’ve been doing, and cover our costs for a second issue of the APT newspaper.

CLICK HERE TO VOTE!

There are just 4 days of voting left so we’d truly appreciate it if you help us spread the word! (You can share our entry on Facebook or Twitter directly from the website after voting.) Thank you thank you!

In Madrid’s Heart, Park Blooms Where a Freeway Once Blighted

mas-studio:

More than six miles long, Madrid Río took over a neglected area of Spain’s capital, knitting together neighborhoods that had been severed from the city center. An artcile by Michael Kimmelman (New York Times)

styraciflua:

The Highline - James Corner Field Operations

Nice. View high resolution

styraciflua:

The Highline - James Corner Field Operations

Nice.

(Source: worldlandscapearchitect.com)

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